Uncategorized
  • May 8, 2009
  • 11

World’s Finest in Action

“Each day they organize and walk Afghan Army patrols in the valley below, some of the most dangerous acreage in the world. Each night they participate in radio meetings with the American posts along the ridges, exchanging plans and intelligence, and plotting the counterinsurgency effort in the ancient villages below.”

By C. J. CHIVERS Afghanistan New York Times, May 1, 2009, click for full story originally published April 30, 2009 Photos by Tyler Hicks, New York Times.

Today’s offering is an article about one of my gunslingers who deployed with Kilo Company last year. He extended to participate with the Embedded Training Teams in Afghanistan.
Cpl Conroy was part of a squad I was on patrol with in Kharmah, Iraq when a sniper took a shot at us (a story for another day). Since then he has probably seen more action than I ever will.

Below, the forces of evil tremble as an American fighting man patrols the area.
Each day Corporal Conroy and his assistant, 21-year-old Lance Cpl. Brandon J. Murray, of Fort Myers, Fla., organize and walk Afghan Army patrols in the Korengal Valley, some of the most dangerous acreage in the world. Each night they participate in radio meetings with the American posts along the ridges, exchanging plans and intelligence, and plotting the counterinsurgency effort in the ancient villages below.

Look at this picture below. That is the way of the warrior right there (as opposed to lounging in a FOB with Cinnabon and ice cream). Fighting and living out of a small fort like this is why we joined up in the first place. Anyone reminded of F-Troop?
Lance Corporal Murray, left, and Corporal Conroy at Firebase Vimoto. A laptop belonging to Afghan soldiers played an Indian music video. An Embedded Training Team (ETT) is based in the Afghanistan’s Korangal Valley, where the United States Army has a blocking position, and Marines are training units from the Afghan National Army with hopes they will become self-sufficient and eventually control the valley themselves.

I will wrap up this entry with a comment on the picture above. You are looking at two young Americans who are making more of an impact on events in Afghanistan than all the protesters, haters, and the entire population of Berkeley, California ever will.

Can they really make a difference you ask? Well, if I may plagiarize a phrase:

YES THEY CAN.

Semper Fidelis,

America’s 1stSgt

/ / / /

11 comments

  1. Hi there.

    I found your blog just yesterday and made it one of my fav’s right away.

    What you are doing/achieving/going through there is appreciated by me. Really.
    Good luck. I hope you wont need too much of it (but a little bit is never wrong).

    Yours sincerely,
    the grateful german levant326

  2. levant, thanks. We’ll take all the blessings we can get. We might complain about a boring deployment and no door kicking stories to tell; but the best deployment story is always the one that ends with all your troops coming home.

  3. I am sure you will find something interesting to keep you occupied. If you don’t find it, you will come up with something. Just remember, take pictures and send me a copy. heehee…

  4. Top,
    One of my best times in Iraq was when we were with a Marine company on the Syrian border (we were so close to Syria that I threw rocks into the country just so I could someday tell people I did that)…
    some really nice lads they had in our “home” were a small group of Snipers. The amazing things I saw were that they were lead by an E-5 and they went out and did stuff.
    I now have a “former” Army Scout Sniper in my platoon (for “mess kit repair”) who did 3 tours in Iraq…very good dude.

    Be safe

  5. You know, every legal job in the country has a value and contributes to our economic and financial welfare, but we just do not get to go from mind numbing boredom to extreme fear, adrenalin pumping excitement that you guys face on your tours outside the US. You warriors are a special bread, and something I didn’t have to do. But I appreciate and thank you for doing it for us.

  6. CI Roller, the Marine Corps has always relied on strong small unit leadership. We put more responsibility on our young leaders than any other service I think.

    coffeypot, the sad truth is that most of the time we are bored out of our minds. That is when the self discipline really has to kick in.

  7. Thanks for sharing this. It disgusts me that our media prefer to cover the protesters and the whiners in places like Berkeley instead of telling stories like this.

    Luckily, we have brave Americans like yourself to tell us what is really going on over there.

    Stay safe.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

you may like this post